MACS® Imaging and Microscopy Day

MACS® Imaging and Microscopy Day

October 28, 2021

Understand nature’s complexity by cutting-edge imaging and microscopy technologies 

Unlock the next level in your research when experts from all around the globe come together to share their knowledge. The virtual MACS® Imaging and Microscopy Day will host leading scientists from the fields of immuno-oncology and neuroscience to present recent findings achieved through groundbreaking imaging and microscopy technologies.

Take the opportunity to exchange views with your peers in our networking session and get connected with other attendees and technical experts.

The event will be hosted at the online platform Remo. Please find technical information below on this page. Register for free to save your spot!

Program highlights

Get unique insights into how large-scale 3D light sheet microscopy, ultrahigh-content imaging, and multiphoton microscopy can open new avenues in immuno-oncology and neuroscience research. 

Immuno-oncology

Learn how the visualization and detailed analysis of tumor invasion or CAR T cells within the tumor microenvironment boosts research towards the development of new cancer therapies. 

Neuroscience

Discover how cutting-edge imaging technologies allow you to study the nervous system, such as an entire brain, and neuronal connectivity in all their complexity.

Launch of Miltenyi Biotec’s brand-new multiphoton microscope

Be the first to have a look at the new TriM Scope™ Matrix – an instrument that enables all multiphoton applications. Get ready for next-generation intravital microscopy to advance your studies of dynamic processes deep in tissue. 


At the MACS Imaging and Microscopy Day you will get to know the latest technologies and sample preparation solutions – designed to help you understand nature’s complexity. 

MACS® Imaging and Microscopy Day

October 28, 2021

6:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time (PDT)
9:00 a.m.–3:30 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time (EDT)
3:00 p.m.–9:30 p.m. Central European Summer Time (CEST)

Register now

Agenda (Time EDT)

9:00 a.m.

Event opening
Find a virtual seat and get familiar with the event platform

9:20 a.m.

Welcome by the host

9:35 a.m.

Understand nature’s complexity – Miltenyi Biotec’s imaging technologies
Speaker: Dr. Stefan Eulitz


 

IMMUNO-ONCOLOGY SESSION

9:50 a.m.

Ultrahigh-content imaging helps to identify CAR target candidates against pancreatic adenocarcinoma
Speaker: Dr. Daniel Schäfer

10:20 a.m.

Visualizing cancer – immunological profiling of cancer by ultrahigh–content imaging
Speaker: Christian Seitz, M.D.

10:40 a.m.

 

Networking Café – Talk to our speakers and technology experts

11:00 a.m.

3D visualization and quantification of CAR T cell infiltration in a solid tumor model using light sheet ultramicroscopy
Speaker: Dr. Rita Pfeiffer

11:30 a.m.

Clear signals from cleared tissues – recombinant antibodies validated for 3D immunofluorescence microscopy
Speaker: Dr. Markus Habich

11:45 a.m.

Intravital multiphoton and higher harmonic generation microscopy for monitoring immune cell dynamics in tumor tissue niches
Speaker: Prof. Dr. Bettina Weigelin

12:15 p.m.

A new turn for multiphoton microscopy looking at samples from all angles with the new TriM Scope™ Matrix
Speaker: Dr. David Reismann

12:30 p.m.

Networking Café – Talk to our speakers and technology experts


 

NEUROSCIENCE SESSION

1:00 p.m.

Using MICS technology for unbiased epitope analysis of postmortem multiple sclerosis brain tissue
Speaker: Volker Siffrin, M.D.

1:30 p.m.

Application of a novel tissue clearing protocol for the study of visual projections
Speaker: Robin Vigouroux, Ph.D.

2:00 p.m.

Leveraging whole-brain imaging and neural network analysis to study addiction in pre-clinical models
Speaker: Adam Kimbrough, Ph.D.

2:30 p.m.

Two-photon optogenetics beyond 1100 nm for specific and effective all-optical physiology of cortical microcircuits in mouse cortex
Speaker: Prof. Dr. Albrecht Stroh

3:00 p.m.

Concluding remarks

3:10 p.m.

Networking Café – Talk to our speakers and technology experts

Speakers and abstracts
 

Speaker: Christian Seitz, M.D.

University Children’s Hospital Tübingen, Germany

About the speaker

Christian Seitz, M.D., is Pediatrician at the University Children’s Hospital Tübingen, Germany. He studied medicine at the universities in Ulm and Frankfurt, Germany, as well as at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, MD, USA. He received his doctorate, Dr. med., from the Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany. In 2014, he started his clinical training in pediatrics under Rupert Handgretinger at the University Children’s Hospital Tübingen, focusing on stem cell transplantation and cellular therapies. His scientific work is focused on the development and clinical translation of modular chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) technologies and the interaction of CAR T cells in the tumor microenvironment. 

Abstract
Visualizing cancer – immunological profiling of cancer by ultrahigh–content imaging

A comprehensive understanding of the antigen landscape, intratumoral heterogeneity, cellular composition and spatial architecture of the tumor microenvironment (TME), as well as the functional immune-evasive setup of solid tumors is indispensable to create “evidence-based” combinatorial immunotherapies and instruct next-generation CAR T cell engineering. The MACSima™ Platform with its ultrahigh-content imaging capacity provides a powerful “plug-and-play” analytic tool to address these clinically crucial questions based on fluorescence microscopy. In first feasibility studies, we established and validated comprehensive antibody panels (>100 markers), including target antigens, cell lineage and functional state phenotyping, druggable immune checkpoints, as well as extracellular matrix components. These panels were applied to analyze primary tumor samples of various tumor entities, resulting in highly coherent and reproducible data sets. We were able to demonstrate feasibility for “on-the-fly” sample evaluation to inform precision immunotherapy. Besides multidimensional analysis of clinical specimens, we have started integrating the MACSima Imaging Platform in our pre-clinical research workflow to study the interaction between CAR T cells and tumor/TME, demonstrating spatially restricted bidirectional induction of protein expression in preliminary experiments.

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Speaker: Volker Siffrin, M.D.

Department of Neurology and Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany

About the speaker

Volker Siffrin, M.D., is Clinical Neurologist at the Department of Neurology and Head of the Neuroimmunology Lab at the Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany. His work contributes to the understanding of the immunology of multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. He is an expert in life imaging techniques and animal models of MS as well as clinical expert in diagnosis and treatment of neuroinflammatory diseases leading an outpatient clinic for neuroimmunology at the Charité Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin, Germany. 

Abstract
Using MICS technology for unbiased epitope analysis of postmortem multiple sclerosis brain tissue

We characterized post-mortem multiple sclerosis (MS) patient–derived CNS material by multiplexed fluorescence microscopy. To this end, we obtained tissue blocks of chronic active lesions and active demyelinating lesions of individual MS patients from the Netherlands Brain Bank (NBB). The aim was to define the composition of CNS cells and peripheral immune cell subpopulations in MS lesions and control, i.e., normal-appearing brain tissue, by multiplexed immunofluorescent labeling of a large set of epitopes. Fluorescent antibodies were chosen from known canonical markers of CNS-resident cells and cells infiltrating from the peripheral immune system. Furthermore, we included additional markers to detect characterized tissue-resident CNS T and B cells, pathology-associated microglia and astrocytes. By combining pixel-colocalization with an object-based nearest neighborhood approach, the distribution of marker combinations was analyzed in the tissue. This approach generated a comprehensive, topological characterization of the MS lesion.

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Speaker: Prof. Dr. Bettina Weigelin

Werner Siemens Imaging Center, University of Tübingen

About the speaker

Bettina Weigelin is Professor at the Werner Siemens Imaging Center in the Department for Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, University of Tübingen, Germany. Her research combines dynamic intravital microscopy with macroscopic PET/MR imaging to provide mechanistic insights into cellular therapies at the tissue and whole-body scale and to identify strategies for improved cancer immunotherapies. 

Abstract
Intravital multiphoton and higher harmonic generation microscopy for monitoring immune cell dynamics in tumor tissue niches
Most of our knowledge of cellular function in cancer immunotherapy is based on the reconstruction of dynamic events from static images. With the rise of intravital microscopy it became possible to directly monitor the dynamic processes of immune response within tissue niches provided by the microenvironment. We applied intravital multiphoton microscopy (iMPM) to capture all functionally relevant steps of adoptive T cell transfer, including arrival of transferred cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in the lesion, early effector function, and induction of tolerance and CTL death. This approach allowed us to identify a CTL crowd-based killing mechanism dependent on serial CTL-tumor cell interactions and the accumulation of sublethal hits to overcome melanoma cell resistance. The cooperation between multiple CTL requires high local density of antigen-specific CTL and may thereby provide a “filter” which limits unintended tissue damage by mistargeted CTL. We further identified the tumor invasion niche as yet unappreciated tumor subregion with particular high CTL swarming, multi-hit activity and tumor cell eradication. In summary, iMPM identified ‘additive cytotoxicity’ as novel mechanism which defines the efficacy of CTL effector function and can be exploited by targeted immunotherapy to increase both single contact efficacy and cooperation of immune effector cells. 

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Speaker: Robin Vigouroux, Ph.D.

Institut de la Vision, Sorbonne Université, Paris, France

About the speaker

Robin Vigouroux, Ph.D., obtained his Bachelor degree with major in Neuroscience and Integrative Biology at the University of Toronto, Canada. Thereafter, he completed his Master’s degree in Physiology at the Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, where he studied the implications of axon guidance molecules and their role in blood brain barrier permeability in the laboratory of Philippe Monnier.
To further study the role of axon guidance molecules during early patterning of the nervous system, Robin returned to France to accomplish his Ph.D. in Neuroscience at the Sorbonne University, Paris, in the lab of Alain Chédotal at the Institut de la Vision. During his Ph.D., Robin developed a novel tissue clearing protocol for the study of the visual system, which was until now inaccessible due to the high pigmentation of the eyes. Using this protocol, Robin was able to better study the molecular mechanisms at play during optic nerve development and was able to extend his studies to a broad range of animal models. 

Abstract
Application of a novel tissue clearing protocol for the study of visual projections

Despite the large diversity observed in the animal kingdom, the general organization of the eye appeared more than 500 million years ago in the first vertebrates. The physiological basis of vision depends on photoreceptor cells within the retina of the eye which transmit a light signal to the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that form the optic nerve. RGCs are the only mediators of the visual signal between the retina and the brain. In mammals, a subset of RGC axons project into the contralateral brain while the other does not cross the midline and project into visual targets in the ipsilateral brain, this is called bilateral projections. This particularity of the mammalian visual projections forms in each hemisphere an image of each eye which results in three-dimensional (3D) vision. It was unknown whether this strategy was common to other phyla in the animal kingdom, and when this particular trait first appeared.
During his Ph.D., Robin Vigouroux developed a novel protocol to visualize the sheer broadness of visual projections that extend from the eyes to the brain. Several studies proposed that 3D vision occurred with the emergence of tetrapods during the water-to-land transition, where animals required a more precise depth perception for predation. To answer this question, Robin focused on the vertebrate phylum. More specifically, he studied ray-finned fishes that predate the emergence of tetrapods by more than 150 million years and represent more than half of the vertebrate species. Injection of an axonal tracer, in combination with a novel tissue clearing technique and 3D imaging, enabled Robin to show that bilateral projections appeared in the most ancient ray-finned fish and was progressively lost during evolution. Furthermore, he showed that the molecular program responsible for the bilateral projections present in these “ancient” fish was entirely different than the one present in mammals. Together, this work opens the idea that a wider array of model organisms is required to better understand fundamental mechanisms during neural development.

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Speaker: Adam Kimbrough, Ph.D.

Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine, West Lafayette, IN, USA

About the speaker

Dr. Adam Kimbrough received his Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Florida State University in 2015 studying taste and flavor learning. Adam then went to work at the Scripps Research Institute and the University of California San Diego, USA, under Dr. Olivier George studying substance use disorders, with a focus on withdrawal behavior and neurocircuitry. He began his lab at Purdue University as an Assistant Professor in September of 2020. The focus of his research is to better understand neural networks and neural circuitry involved in substance use disorders, especially alcohol and opioids, and mental health disorders.

Abstract 
Leveraging whole-brain imaging and neural network analysis to study addiction in pre-clinical models

Neural mechanisms involved in substance use disorders have been relatively well characterized over the past several decades. However, much remains unknown about how the motivation for excessive drug use develops. Recent developments in neuroscience tools such as tissue clearing, light sheet imaging, and network analysis have enabled novel approaches to dissect the neurocircuitry of the brain in greater detail. These approaches provide insight into brain regions that may be critically important for the development of addiction and other mental health disorders.  Dr. Kimbrough will present data examining neural activity and network changes during abstinence from drug dependence. These data will show how new neuroscience tools can be used in a practical manner to identify novel brain regions that may be critically involved in a well-studied disorder.

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Speaker: Prof. Dr. Albrecht Stroh 

Leibniz Institute for Resilience Research, Mainz, Germany; Institute of Pathophysiology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Germany

About the speaker

Prof. Dr. Albrecht Stroh is Head of the Research Group “Molecular Imaging and Optogenetics” at the Institute of Pathophysiology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Germany, and Head of the Mainz Animal Imaging Center (MAIC), Leibniz Institute for Resilience Research, Mainz, Germany. His research group investigates the interrelation of spontaneous and sensory-evoked activity of single neurons, and neuronal ensembles, on the (dysregulated) functional halamocortical network in rodents, both under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. 

Abstract
Two-photon optogenetics beyond 1100 nm for specific and effective all-optical physiology of cortical microcircuits in mouse cortex

Neurological disorders as diverse as multiple sclerosis (MS), Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and Huntington´s disease (HD) are characterized by a functional impairment of neural circuits underlying cognitive and motor functions. We employed network-centered approaches in early-stage models of these disorders, aiming at defining the network as own pathophysiological entity. Indeed, although demyelination and axonal damage or neuronal and synapse loss are central in the pathophysiology, only recently neuronal network dysfunctions, representing new allostatic set points on network level, have been proposed to have a significant contribution to disease burden. Yet, to assess these early changes, we need to employ imaging methods capable of resolving the functional architecture of the cortical network, with single-neuron resolution, and, ultimately, with single-neuron cross-talk–free optogenetic interrogation. Two-photon (2-P) all-optical approaches combine in vivo 2-P calcium imaging and 2-P optogenetic modulations. We conducted and developed in vivo juxtacellular recordings and GCaMP6f-based 2-P calcium imaging in mouse visual cortex to tune a detection algorithm towards a 100% specific identification of AP-related calcium transients. Secondly, we minimized photostimulation artifacts by using extended-wavelength-spectrum laser sources for optogenetic stimulation. We achieved artifact-free all-optical experiments performing optogenetic stimulation from 1100 nm to 1300 nm. Thirdly, we determined the spectral range for maximizing efficacy up to 1300 nm. The rate of evoked transients in GCaMP6f/C1V1–co-expressing cortical neurons peaked already at 1100 nm. By refining spike detection and defining 1100 nm as the optimal wavelength for artifact-free and effective GCaMP6f/C1V1-based all-optical physiology, we increased the translational value of these approaches, e.g., for the development of network-based therapies. 

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Speaker: Dr. Rita Pfeifer

Miltenyi Biotec B.V. & Co. KG, Research and Development, Bergisch Gladbach, Germany

About the speaker

Dr. Rita Pfeifer studied Biochemistry at the University of Tübingen, Germany, followed by a position as Research Fellow at the Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, USA. Thereafter, she returned to Germany to start her Ph.D. at the University of Tübingen and Miltenyi Biotec. Since 2018, she continues her work with Miltenyi Biotec as Team Coordinator Research and Development, focusing on in vivo and ex vivo tracking and the development of CAR T cell therapies against solid tumors.   

Abstract
3D visualization and quantification of CAR T cell infiltration in a solid tumor model using light sheet microscopy

While promising results have been achieved with CAR T cells in the treatment of hematological malignancies, outcomes of trials with solid tumors have mostly fallen short of expectations. One major difficulty in the development of CAR T cell therapy against solid tumors is the lack of spatiotemporal information, which would enable the efficient monitoring of T cell localization and distribution within the tumor. Advanced imaging methods are capable of providing this information and can support the prediction of therapeutic efficacy. In this study, we used light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) to analyze CAR T cell infiltration in a subcutaneous pancreatic xenograft model at single-cell level. A striking observation was that the majority of tumor-infiltrating T cells was located in the tumor periphery in a heterogeneous, island-like distribution, and only a small fraction was able to reach the tumor core. Subsequent quantification allowed us to determine the infiltration depth of each individual T cell from the vasculature and the tumor surface, thereby identifying regions of highest CAR T cell activity. Overall, LSFM analyses with cellular and spatial resolution facilitate the investigation of CAR T cell behavior within solid tumors and provide new insights for the development of novel, more efficacious CAR T cell–based immunotherapies. 

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Speaker: Dr. Daniel Schäfer

Miltenyi Biotec B.V. & Co. KG, Research and Development, Bergisch Gladbach, Germany

About the speaker

After studying Biology at the University of Antwerp, Belgium, University of Manchester, UK, and University of Cologne, Germany, Daniel completed his Ph.D. in Molecular Medicine at the University Medical Center Göttingen, Germany. At Miltenyi Biotec he works as Team Coordinator in the Research and Development Department using his interdisciplinary education and scientific experience to push forward the development of new technologies for CAR T cell therapy, their preclinical evaluation, and translation into clinical applications.

Abstract
Ultrahigh-content imaging helps to identify CAR target candidates against pancreatic adenocarcinoma

Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells have become a new pillar of cancer therapy. They proved outstanding efficacies in leukemic patients, formerly believed to be beyond treatment. However, the remarkable success of CAR T cell–based therapies in the context of liquid tumors could not yet be translated to the field of solid malignancies.
Using the innovative MICS (MACSima™ Imaging Cyclic Staining) technology, we managed to overcome a major scientific obstacle which so far has impeded the development of effective cellular immunotherapy of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: the lack of suitable tumor-specific antigens. Our research led to the identification of four CAR target candidates among 371 antigens tested. This in turn resulted in the generation of 32 CARs whose potential for therapeutic approaches has been evaluated. To this end, CAR T cell activity was first tested in vitro. Based on that, promising constructs were used to assess their activity in vivo. Efficacies in pre-clinical studies ranged from stabilized disease to complete tumor eradication.   

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Speaker: Dr. Markus Habich

Miltenyi Biotec B.V. & Co. KG, Bergisch Gladbach, Germany

About the speaker

Dr. Markus Habich completed his Master’s degree in Cell Biology and Physiology at the University of Kaiserslautern, Germany, in 2014. During his Ph.D. in Biochemistry at the University of Cologne, Germany, he focused on the mitochondrial function and biogenesis in mammalian cells and published his studies on a novel quality control mechanism during protein import into mitochondria. Fascinated by the development of innovative solutions for imaging of biological systems, Markus joined Miltenyi Biotec in 2019 as Global Product Manager where he advances the portfolios of reagents and antibodies for 3D imaging as well as imaging antibodies for the MACSima Imaging Platform. 

Abstract
Clear signals from cleared tissues – recombinant antibodies validated for 3D immunofluorescence microscopy

Tissue clearing in combination with 3D-immunofluorescence (IF) microscopy has the potential to revolutionize research in many areas by enabling scientists to analyze complex biological systems in detail. For tissue clearing Miltenyi Biotec provides the MACS® Clearing Kit, which is based on an optimized, fast, and easy protocol. However, getting reliable protocols to stain the markers of interest has been a huge challenge so far, and the validation of antibodies for 3D-IF applications is very time-consuming and costly. To support researchers in their endeavors, Miltenyi Biotec developed a novel portfolio of recombinantly engineered antibodies tested specifically for 3D-IF microscopy, using tissue samples cleared with the MACS Clearing Kit. Easy-to-follow protocols enable specific staining of large samples for meaningful 3D imaging data. The vast range of 3D-IF antibodies, the MACS Clearing Kit, and UltraMicroscope instruments now provide a complete workflow solution for cutting-edge 3D-IF imaging.
In this talk, Markus Habich will give insight into the ins and outs of whole-mount antibody labeling of large samples and associated challenges. He will also discuss details of the features and benefits of the newly launched 3D-IF antibody portfolio.

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Speaker: Dr. David Reismann

LaVision Biotec GmbH – a Miltenyi Biotec company, Bielefeld, Germany

About the speaker

Dr. David Reismann is Product Manager for Multiphoton Microscopy at LaVision Biotec GmbH – a Miltenyi Biotec company. Before joining LaVision BioTec as Imaging Sales Specialist in 2018, he completed his Ph.D. in the lab of Raluca Niesner and Anja Hauser at the German Rheumatism Research Center in Berlin, Germany, with a focus on longitudinal multiphoton microendoscopy in the bone marrow of mice. David obtained his Master’s degree in Medical Biotechnology from the Technical University of Berlin, Germany.

Abstract
A new turn for multiphoton microscopy looking at samples from all angles with the new TriM Scope™ Matrix

Multiphoton microscopy allows for direct in vivo observation of cellular processes, deep in intact tissue, at subcellular resolution. During the last decades this technique evolved vastly, became more and more essential in today’s biomedical research laboratories, and ultimately helped to better understand nature’s complexity. Since its first introduction in 2001, the TriM Scope™ Multiphoton Microscope family has offered modular platforms for research areas such as developmental biology, immuno-oncology, and neuroscience. Instruments can be equipped with a variety of lasers, scanner configurations, detectors, and dedicated modules for in vivo imaging. The specific application determines the setup of the microscope as many experiments will require a particular orientation of the objective lens. Upright configurations are used for applications like calcium imaging; in vivo imaging in brain, bone marrow, and lymph node; or electrophysiological recordings. Inverted configurations are preferred for the observation of cell cultures; in vivo imaging of organs like liver, kidney, and intestine; or where there is a need to access samples from above. In addition, there are applications, especially in behavioral research, that require a lot of space for special accessories. To cover all applications with a single device, we rethought the concept of upright and inverted configurations for multiphoton microscopy.

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Speaker: Dr. Stefan Eulitz

Miltenyi Biotec B.V. & Co. KG, Bergisch Gladbach, Germany

About the speaker

Dr. Stefan Eulitz is Global Customer Liaison Manager at Miltenyi Biotec. With more than 10 years' experience of cyclic imaging in industry and academia, Stefan combines bench and business knowledge. During his Ph.D. at the Rheinische-Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn, Germany, and as consultant at the French company Alcimed, he gained deep knowledge of various imaging technologies as well as drug target and biomarker discovery. Stefan joined Miltenyi Biotec in 2015 to support the development of the MACSima™ Imaging Platform as Deputy Development Program Leader and currently supports researchers in the adaption of Miltenyi Biotec’s imaging technologies from basic research and development to commercial research strategies. 

Abstract
Understand nature’s complexity – Miltenyi Biotec’s imaging technologies

Cells are the building blocks of life and nature. They can be extremely versatile and specifically adapted to their environment. Therefore, they exist in many shapes, states, and types. Unveiling the function and interaction of cells provides the key to understanding nature’s complexity. However, the interplay of different cell types at a certain location under specific environmental conditions can only be analyzed in the overall context.
To start deciphering these complex processes and interdependencies you need advanced techniques that can provide you with the necessary insight. This is the reason why Miltenyi Biotec continuously develops cutting-edge imaging technologies that allow you to observe dynamic processes in living animals, analyze whole animals and organs in 3D, and perform the world's deepest characterization of cells. We are happy to take you with us on a journey to the possibilities of imaging technologies and towards understanding nature's complexity. 

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Explore Miltenyi Biotec’s versatile imaging solutions
during the event

MACSima™ Imaging Platform

The MACSima Imaging Platform enables the analysis of hundreds of markers on a single sample, multiple samples at a time. Staining and imaging occurs in a fully automated manner, based on MICS (MACSima Imaging Cyclic Staining) technology, while preserving tissue integrity and capturing the spatial context. As a perfect complement to this, Miltenyi Biotec offers fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies specifically validated for MICS technology. Discover the possibilities ultrahigh-content imaging opens up to advance your research faster.

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UltraMicroscope Blaze™ Light Sheet Imaging System

The UltraMicroscope Blaze is the only fully automated light sheet microscope for imaging large or multiple cleared samples in 3D. The combination of our cutting-edge light sheet illumination technology and objective lenses ensures unprecedented image quality across scales – whether imaging single tumor cells in a whole cleared mouse or subcellular details in multiple mouse brains.

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TriM Scope™ Multiphoton Microscopes

Our multiphoton microscopy platforms allow you to explore dynamic biological processes in vivo, deep in tissue. TriM Scope Multiphoton Microscopes provide all the flexibility needed for optimizing imaging speed, depth, and quality – no matter if the focus is on immunology, oncology, or neuroscience. 

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Reagents for imaging and microscopy

Miltenyi Biotec’s ready-to-use, non-toxic MACS Clearing Kit effectively renders samples transparent for optimal 3D immunofluorescence imaging. Our soon-to-be-released 3D-IF antibodies are specifically validated for whole-mount staining of large, cleared samples. For maximum reliability, ultimately producing more conclusive results, all 3D-IF antibodies are functionally validated with the MACS Clearing Kit. Easy-to-follow tissue staining and clearing protocols enable hassle-free 3D imaging.

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The event will be hosted through the online platform Remo 

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October 28, 2021
6:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time (PDT) |  9:00 a.m.–3:30 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time (EDT) |  
3:00 p.m.–9:30 p.m. Central European Summer Time (CEST)

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