CD4 MicroBeads were developed for the positive selection or depletion of CD4
+
cells by direct magnetic labeling. The most commonly used cell sources are peripheral blood, leukapheresis
1
, and cord blood. In addition, T helper cells have also been isolated from lymph nodes, thymus, spleen, skin biopsies
2
, synovial fluids, and cell cultures.

Data and images for CD4 MicroBeads, human

Figures

Figure 1

View details
Isolation of CD4
+
cells from PBMCs using CD4 MicroBeads, an MS Column, and a MiniMACS™ Separator.

Figure 1

Isolation of CD4
+
cells from PBMCs using CD4 MicroBeads, an MS Column, and a MiniMACS™ Separator.

Figure 2

View details
CD4
+
T helper cells isolated from PBMCs using CD4 MicroBeads. Cells were stained with CD4-FITC in parallel to magnetic labeling.

Figure 2

CD4
+
T helper cells isolated from PBMCs using CD4 MicroBeads. Cells were stained with CD4-FITC in parallel to magnetic labeling.

Specifications for CD4 MicroBeads, human

Overview

CD4 MicroBeads were developed for the positive selection or depletion of CD4
+
cells by direct magnetic labeling. The most commonly used cell sources are peripheral blood, leukapheresis
1
, and cord blood. In addition, T helper cells have also been isolated from lymph nodes, thymus, spleen, skin biopsies
2
, synovial fluids, and cell cultures.

Detailed product information

Background information

CD4 is an accessory molecule in the recognition of MHC class II/peptide complexes by the TCR heterodimers on CD4
+
T helper cells. CD4 is expressed on T helper cells and at a lower level on monocytes and dendritic cells. The CD4 molecule is the receptor for the human immunodeficiency virus. The CD4 antibody recognizes most thymocytes and about 65% of all peripheral blood T cells.

Downstream applications

Isolation or depletion of CD4
+
T helper cells is performed in many different fields of research, such as infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases, allergy, asthma, and tumor immunology. T helper cells isolated by MACS® Technology remain viable and functional. Therefore, they can be used for further functional studies, such as proliferation assays
10
and cytotoxicity assays
3
, as well as for the generation of T cell lines
9
. CD4
+
T cells purified with CD4 MicroBeads have also been cultured and analyzed for
in vitro
cytokine production.
4
Furthermore, they have been used in co‑culture experiments, e.g., for allogeneic stimulation by dendritic cells
1
or for B cell activation
2
.
T helper cells isolated by MACS
®
Tech­nology were also used for studies on viral infections, e.g., for
in vitro
infections of cells with HIV
5
, to determine the infectivity of HIV-infected follicular dendritic cells
6
, immune reconstitution after anti-viral therapy
7
, and for monitoring of immune abnormalities in children of HIV-infected mothers
8
.

Columns

For positive selection: MS, LS, XS, or autoMACS
®
Columns. For depletion: LD, D, or autoMACS Columns.

Reviews for CD4 MicroBeads, human

Miltenyi CD4 Microbeads, Human - Reliable Method for the Magnetic Positive Selection of CD4+ T Cells from Human PBMC

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CD4 MicroBeads, human (130-045-101)

Several of our in vitro experiments require purified primary CD4+ T cells . We have worked with total PBMC in the past, but found that using purified CD4+ T cells gave more consistent results. After comparing different cell separation technologies, we settled upon CD4+ Microbeads from Miltenyi given their consistency, quick protocol, and purity of the isolated cells.

MicroBeads For Purification Of Human CD4 Positive Cells

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CD4 MicroBeads, human (130-045-101)

We use these beads to purify CD4+ T cells from human PBMCs. The protocol is very straight forward and gives consistent results.

CD4 Magnetic Bead Isolation

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CD4 MicroBeads, human (130-045-101)

Our lab studies HIV immunology which requires the isolation of CD4+ cells for in vitro infection. These beads provide a reliable way to isolate this cell population from human PBMCs for downstream applications.

References for CD4 MicroBeads, human

Publications

  1. Jonuleit, H. et al. (2000)
    Induction of interleukin 10-producing, nonproliferating CD4
    +
    T cells with regulatory properties by repetitive stimulation with allogeneic immature human dendritic cells.
    J. Exp. Med. 192: 1213-1222
  2. Akdis, M. et al. (1999)
    Skin homing (cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen-positive) CD8
    +
    T cells respond to superantigen and contribute to eosinophilia and IgE production in atopic dermatitis.
    J. Immunol. 163: 466-475
  3. Parra, E. et al. (1997)
    The role of B7-1 and LFA-3 in costimulation of CD8
    +
    T cells.
    J. Immunol. 158: 637-642
  4. Akdis, A. C. et al. (1995) Cytokine immunotrapping: an assay to study the kinetics of production and consumption or degradation of human interferon-gamma. J. Immunol. Methods 182: 251-261
  5. Ennen, J. et al. (1994) CD8+ T lymphocytes of African green monkeys secrete an immunodeficiency virus-suppressing lymphokine. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 91: 7207-7211
  6. Heath, S. L. et al. (1995) Follicular dendritic cells and human immunodeficiency virus infectivity. Nature 377: 740-744
  7. Douek, D. C. et al. (1998) Changes in thymic function with age and during the treatment of HIV infection. Nature 396: 690-695
  8. Nielsen, S. D. et al. (2001) Impaired progenitor cell function in HIV-negative infants of HIV-positive mothers results in decreased thymic output and low CD4 counts. Blood 98: 398-404
  9. Kim, J. Y. et al. (2004) BH3-only protein Noxa is a mediator of hypoxic cell death induced by hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha. J. Exp. Med. 199: 113-1142
  10. Engedal, N. et al. (2006) All-trans retinoic acid stimulates IL-2-mediated proliferation of human T lymphocytes: early induction of cyclin D3. J. Immunol. 177: 2851-2861

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