CD15 MicroBeads were developed for positive selection or depletion of CD15
+
cells from human lysed peripheral blood or single-cell suspensions from tissues.

Data and images for CD15 MicroBeads, human

Figures

Figure 1

CD15
+
cells were isolated from lysed human peripheral blood using CD15 MicroBeads,
an MS Column, and a MiniMACS™ Separator. Cells are fluorescently stained with CD15
-
FITC.
Unseparated fraction
CD15
cells
View details

Figure 1

CD15
+
cells were isolated from lysed human peripheral blood using CD15 MicroBeads,
an MS Column, and a MiniMACS™ Separator. Cells are fluorescently stained with CD15
-
FITC.
View details

Figure 1

CD15
+
cells were isolated from lysed human peripheral blood using CD15 MicroBeads,
an MS Column, and a MiniMACS™ Separator. Cells are fluorescently stained with CD15
-
FITC.
Enriched CD15
+
cells
View details

Figure 1

CD15
+
cells were isolated from lysed human peripheral blood using CD15 MicroBeads,
an MS Column, and a MiniMACS™ Separator. Cells are fluorescently stained with CD15
-
FITC.

Specifications for CD15 MicroBeads, human

Overview

CD15 MicroBeads were developed for positive selection or depletion of CD15
+
cells from human lysed peripheral blood or single-cell suspensions from tissues.

Detailed product information

Background information

The CD15 antibody recognizes a 3-fucosyl-N-acetyllactosamine carbohydrate modification in glycolipids or glycoproteins. The CD15 antigen is expressed on neutrophils, eosinophils, and monoblastoid precursor cells of the myeloid lineage but not on basophils and lymphocytes. The antigen is also present on Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells.

Downstream applications

CD15 MicroBeads are used for the isolation
1
or depletion of human eosinophils and neutrophils (basophils are CD15
-
) from peripheral blood and from tissues such as ovarian carcinoma tissue.
2
Furthermore, CD15 MicroBeads can be used for the depletion of myeloid cells from bone marrow.

Columns

For positive selection: MS, LS, XS, or autoMACS
®
Columns. For depletion: LD, D, or autoMACS Columns.

References for CD15 MicroBeads, human

Publications

  1. Zahler, S. et al. (1997) The function of neutrophils isolated by a magnetic antibody cell separation technique is not altered in comparison to a density gradient centrifugation method. J. Immunol. Methods 200: 173-179
  2. Harbeck, N. et al. (1995) Model system for isolation of competent ovarian-carcinoma cells from fresh tumor-tissue by a magnetic separation technique (MACS). Int. J. Oncol. 6: 1249-1254

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