Anti-Rat IgG MicroBeads, formerly known as Goat Anti-Rat IgG MicroBeads, can be used in combination with any primary rat IgG antibody for the magnetic labeling and separation of cells. Anti-Rat IgG MicroBeads recognize the heavy and light chains of all rat IgG isotypes. The goat F(ab')
2
fragments have been affinity adsorbed to remove any cross-reactivity to mouse immunoglobulins.

Data and images for Anti-Rat IgG MicroBeads

Figures

Figure 1

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Separation of mouse spleen cells using rat anti-mouse CD45R antibody (isotype: IgG2a), Anti-Rat IgG MicroBeads, and a MiniMACS™ Separator with an MS Column.

Figure 1

Separation of mouse spleen cells using rat anti-mouse CD45R antibody (isotype: IgG2a), Anti-Rat IgG MicroBeads, and a MiniMACS™ Separator with an MS Column.

Specifications for Anti-Rat IgG MicroBeads

Overview

Anti-Rat IgG MicroBeads, formerly known as Goat Anti-Rat IgG MicroBeads, can be used in combination with any primary rat IgG antibody for the magnetic labeling and separation of cells. Anti-Rat IgG MicroBeads recognize the heavy and light chains of all rat IgG isotypes. The goat F(ab')
2
fragments have been affinity adsorbed to remove any cross-reactivity to mouse immunoglobulins.

Detailed product information

Downstream applications

Anti-Rat IgG MicroBeads have been used for the isolation of murine leukocyte subsets from brain tissue
1
, for the separation of murine T cell subsets from PBMCs
2
, for the isolation of murine dermal macrophages
3
as well as for the isolation of intraepithelial CD8β
+
lymphocytes from murine intestine
4
. They have also been used for the separation of CD105- and CD106-expressing endothelial cells from murine aortic tissue.
5

Columns

For positive selection: MS, LS, XS, or autoMACS
®
Columns. For depletion: LD, D, or autoMACS Columns.

References for Anti-Rat IgG MicroBeads

Publications

  1. Schlüter et al. (1996) Am. J. Pathol. 150: 1021-1035
  2. Schön, M. P. et al. (1997)
    Murine psoriasis-like disorder induced by naive CD4
    +
    T cells.
    Nat Med 3: 183-188
  3. Sato, K. et al. (1998) Contribution of dermal macrophage trafficking in the sensitization phase of contact hypersensitivity. J. Immunol. 161: 6835-6844
  4. Lepage, A. C. et al. (1998) Gut-derived intraepithelial lymphocytes induce long term immunity against Toxoplasma gondii. J. Immunol. 168: 4902-4908
  5. Ploplis, V. A. et al. (2004)
    Enhanced
    in vitro
    proliferation of aortic endothelial cells from plasminogen activator inhibitor-1-deficient mice.
    J. Biol. Chem. 279: 6143-6151

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