The Neural Crest Stem Cell MicroBeads were developed for the positive selection or depletion of neural crest stem cells differentiated from pluripotent stem cells. A method for
in vitro
differentiation of neural crest stem cells from human iPS cells is available in the library section.

Data and images for Neural Crest Stem Cell MicroBeads, human

Figures

Figure 1

Neural crest stem cells were
in vitro
–differentiated from human iPS cells using dorsomorphin for 10 days (10, 11) and subsequently isolated using Neural Crest Stem Cell MicroBeads, two MS Columns, and a MiniMACS™ Separator. Cells were fluorescently stained with CD271 (LNGFR)-PE (# 130-091-885) and analyzed by flow cytometry using the MACSQuant
®
Analyzer. Cell debris and dead cells were excluded from the analysis based on scatter signals and propidium iodide fluorescence.
Before separation
After separation
View details

Figure 1

Neural crest stem cells were
in vitro
–differentiated from human iPS cells using dorsomorphin for 10 days (10, 11) and subsequently isolated using Neural Crest Stem Cell MicroBeads, two MS Columns, and a MiniMACS™ Separator. Cells were fluorescently stained with CD271 (LNGFR)-PE (# 130-091-885) and analyzed by flow cytometry using the MACSQuant
®
Analyzer. Cell debris and dead cells were excluded from the analysis based on scatter signals and propidium iodide fluorescence.
View details

Figure 1

Neural crest stem cells were
in vitro
–differentiated from human iPS cells using dorsomorphin for 10 days (10, 11) and subsequently isolated using Neural Crest Stem Cell MicroBeads, two MS Columns, and a MiniMACS™ Separator. Cells were fluorescently stained with CD271 (LNGFR)-PE (# 130-091-885) and analyzed by flow cytometry using the MACSQuant
®
Analyzer. Cell debris and dead cells were excluded from the analysis based on scatter signals and propidium iodide fluorescence.

Specifications for Neural Crest Stem Cell MicroBeads, human

Overview

The Neural Crest Stem Cell MicroBeads were developed for the positive selection or depletion of neural crest stem cells differentiated from pluripotent stem cells. A method for
in vitro
differentiation of neural crest stem cells from human iPS cells is available in the library section.

Detailed product information

Background information

CD271, also known as LNGFR (low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor), NGFR (nerve growth factor receptor), or p75NTR (neurotrophin receptor), belongs to the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily. CD271 was initially described to be expressed on cells of the nervous system and was suggested to be involved in the development, survival and differentiation of neural cells.
1
CD271 can be found in the central and peripheral nervous system on autonomic and sensory neurons
2
as well as on glial cells, including oligodendrocytes
3
, astrocytes
4
, Schwann cells
5,6
, and neural crest stem cells
7
. Neural crest stem cells can be induced from pluripotent stem cells by synergistic action of two inhibitors of SMAD signaling, Noggin and SB431542
8,9
or alternatively, by a single small molecule dorsomorphin blocking signalling of several (TGF-β) superfamily receptors
10
. CD271
+
neural crest stem cells can be selected ten days post-induction. They show expression of typical neural crest markers (HNK1, AP2) and they can be differentiated to homogenous peripheral neurons
11
.
The CD271 antibody is reported to cross-react with the CD271 antigen in monkey, goat, dog, pig, and sheep
12
.

Columns

For positive selection: MS or autoMACS
®
Columns. For depletion: LD or autoMACS Columns.

References for Neural Crest Stem Cell MicroBeads, human

Publications

  1. Thomson, T. M. et al. (1988) Expression of human nerve growth factor receptor on cells derived from all three germ layers. Exp. Cell Res. 174: 533-539
  2. Kashiba, H. et al. (1995) Coexpression of trk family members and low-affinity neurotrophin receptors in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. Brain Res. Mol. Brain Res. 30(1): 158-164
  3. Casaccia-Bonnefil, P. et al. (1996) Death of oligodendrocytes mediated by the interaction of nerve growth factor with its receptor p75. Nature 383: 716-719
  4. Rudge, J. S. et al. (1994) Neurotrophic factor receptors and their signal transduction capabilities in rat astrocytes. Eur. J. Neurosci. 6: 693-705
  5. DiStefano, P. S. and Johnson, E. M. Jr. (1988) Identification of a truncated form of the nerve growth factor receptor. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 85: 270-274
  6. Vroemen, M. and Weidner, N. (2003) Purification of Schwann cells by selection of p75 low affinity nerve growth factor receptor expressing cells from adult peripheral nerve. J. Neurosci. Methods 12(2): 135-143
  7. Chalazonitis, A. et al. (1998)
    Age-dependent differences in the effects of GDNF and NT-3 on the development of neurons and glia from neural crest-derived precursors immunoselected from the fetal rat gut: expression of GFRalpha-1
    in vitro
    and
    in vivo
    .
    Dev. Biol. 204(2): 385-406
  8. Chambers, S.M. et al. (2009) Highly efficient neural conversion of human ES and iPS cells by dual inhibition of SMAD signaling. Nat. Biotechnol. 27(3): 275-280
  9. Lee, G. et al. (2010) Derivation of neural crest cells from human pluripotent stem cells. Nat. Protoc. 5(4): 688-701
  10. Zhou, J. et al. (2010) High-efficiency induction of neural conversion in human ESCs and human induced pluripotent stem cells with a single chemical inhibitor of transforming growth factor beta superfamily receptors. Stem Cells 28(10): 1741-1750
  11. Schreiner, C. et al. (2012) MACS&more 14(2): 12-15
  12. Rozemuller, H. et al. (2010) Prospective isolation of mesenchymal stem cells from multiple mammalian species using cross-reacting anti-human monoclonal antibodies. Stem Cells Dev. 19: 1911-1921