The MSC Phenotyping Kit was developed for the fast and standardized characterization and quantification of cultured human MSCs by flow cytometry based on the defined ISCT standards
1
.
The MSC Phenotyping Kit applies recombinant engineered REAfinity™ antibodies, and contains
  • A 5-color antibody cocktail including positive markers (CD73, CD90, CD105) and negative markers (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD19, and anti-HLA-DR)
  • A 5-color antibody cocktail for isotype control
  • Individual single color fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies for compensation

Data and images for MSC Phenotyping Kit, human

Figures

Figure 1

Aliquot 1 of cultured MSCs was stained with the MSC Phenotyping Cocktail and aliquot 2 with the Isotype Control Cocktail. The fractions were analyzed by flow cytometry using the MACSQuant
®
Analyzer 10. Each histogram was overlaid with the corresponding isotype control to identify positively stained cells. In order to distinguish between activated MSC and non-MSCs, the HLA-DR antibody (conjugated to different fluorochromes) has been used in combination with other MSC-negative markers.
View details

Figure 1

Aliquot 1 of cultured MSCs was stained with the MSC Phenotyping Cocktail and aliquot 2 with the Isotype Control Cocktail. The fractions were analyzed by flow cytometry using the MACSQuant
®
Analyzer 10. Each histogram was overlaid with the corresponding isotype control to identify positively stained cells. In order to distinguish between activated MSC and non-MSCs, the HLA-DR antibody (conjugated to different fluorochromes) has been used in combination with other MSC-negative markers.
View details

Figure 1

Aliquot 1 of cultured MSCs was stained with the MSC Phenotyping Cocktail and aliquot 2 with the Isotype Control Cocktail. The fractions were analyzed by flow cytometry using the MACSQuant
®
Analyzer 10. Each histogram was overlaid with the corresponding isotype control to identify positively stained cells. In order to distinguish between activated MSC and non-MSCs, the HLA-DR antibody (conjugated to different fluorochromes) has been used in combination with other MSC-negative markers.
View details

Figure 1

Aliquot 1 of cultured MSCs was stained with the MSC Phenotyping Cocktail and aliquot 2 with the Isotype Control Cocktail. The fractions were analyzed by flow cytometry using the MACSQuant
®
Analyzer 10. Each histogram was overlaid with the corresponding isotype control to identify positively stained cells. In order to distinguish between activated MSC and non-MSCs, the HLA-DR antibody (conjugated to different fluorochromes) has been used in combination with other MSC-negative markers.
View details

Figure 1

Aliquot 1 of cultured MSCs was stained with the MSC Phenotyping Cocktail and aliquot 2 with the Isotype Control Cocktail. The fractions were analyzed by flow cytometry using the MACSQuant
®
Analyzer 10. Each histogram was overlaid with the corresponding isotype control to identify positively stained cells. In order to distinguish between activated MSC and non-MSCs, the HLA-DR antibody (conjugated to different fluorochromes) has been used in combination with other MSC-negative markers.
View details

Figure 1

Aliquot 1 of cultured MSCs was stained with the MSC Phenotyping Cocktail and aliquot 2 with the Isotype Control Cocktail. The fractions were analyzed by flow cytometry using the MACSQuant
®
Analyzer 10. Each histogram was overlaid with the corresponding isotype control to identify positively stained cells. In order to distinguish between activated MSC and non-MSCs, the HLA-DR antibody (conjugated to different fluorochromes) has been used in combination with other MSC-negative markers.
View details

Figure 1

Aliquot 1 of cultured MSCs was stained with the MSC Phenotyping Cocktail and aliquot 2 with the Isotype Control Cocktail. The fractions were analyzed by flow cytometry using the MACSQuant
®
Analyzer 10. Each histogram was overlaid with the corresponding isotype control to identify positively stained cells. In order to distinguish between activated MSC and non-MSCs, the HLA-DR antibody (conjugated to different fluorochromes) has been used in combination with other MSC-negative markers.

Specifications for MSC Phenotyping Kit, human

Overview

The MSC Phenotyping Kit was developed for the fast and standardized characterization and quantification of cultured human MSCs by flow cytometry based on the defined ISCT standards
1
.
The MSC Phenotyping Kit applies recombinant engineered REAfinity™ antibodies, and contains
  • A 5-color antibody cocktail including positive markers (CD73, CD90, CD105) and negative markers (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD19, and anti-HLA-DR)
  • A 5-color antibody cocktail for isotype control
  • Individual single color fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies for compensation control

Detailed product information

Background information

Human mesenchymal stem cells or stromal cells (MSCs) hold great promise for regenerative applications like bone- and cartilage repair, as well as for immunomodulatory applications. However, MSCs can be isolated from a variety of tissues, expanded under different conditions, and characterized with regard to differentiation potential as well as cell surface marker expression.
Minimal criteria for a common definition of human MSCs were defined by the Mesenchymal and Tissue Stem Cell Committee of the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) to facilitate a better comparability of data amongst investigators, accelerating new scientific discoveries, and facilitating the development of novel cellular therapies.¹ The committee proposed that MSCs should be plastic adherent when maintained under standard culture conditions. Also MSCs should differentiate to osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes under standard
in vitro
differentiating conditions. When measured by flow cytometry, ≥95% of the MSC population must express CD73, CD90, and CD105, and these cells must lack expression (≤2% positive) of CD34, CD45, CD11b or CD14, CD19 or CD79α, and HLA-DR.

References for MSC Phenotyping Kit, human

Publications

  1. Dominici, M. et al. (2006) Minimal criteria for defining multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells. The International Society for Cellular Therapy position statement. Cytotherapy 8: 315-317
  2. Ho, Y.K. et al. (2020) A highly efficient non-viral process for programming mesenchymal stem cells for gene directed enzyme prodrug cancer therapy Sci Rep 10: 14257
  3. Rahman M.S. et al. (2020)
    The FGF, TGFβ and WNT axis Modulate Self-renewal of Human SIX2
    +
    Urine Derived Renal Progenitor Cells
    Sci Rep 10: 739
  4. Sekine, K. et al. (2020) Generation of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived liver buds with chemically defined and animal origin-free media Sci Rep 10: 17937
  5. Sekine, K. et al. (2020) Robust detection of undifferentiated iPSC among differentiated cells Sci Rep 10: 10293
  6. Kolle, S-F. A. et al. (2020) Ex vivo‐expanded autologous adipose tissue‐derived stromal cells ensure enhanced fat graft retention in breast augmentation: A randomized controlled clinical trial Stem Cells Transl Med 9(11): 1277-1286
  7. Ling, J. et al. (2020) Enhancing the Efficacy of Stem Cell Therapy with Glycosaminoglycans Stem Cell Reports 14(1): 105-121
  8. Damerau, A. et al. (2021) A Human Osteochondral Tissue Model Mimicking Cytokine-Induced Key Features of Arthritis In Vitro Int J Mol Sci 22(1): 128
  9. Gaber, T. et al. (2020) Impact of Janus Kinase Inhibition with Tofacitinib on Fundamental Processes of Bone Healing Int J Mol Sci 21(3): 865
  10. Egger, D. et al. (2019) From 3D to 3D: isolation of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells into a three-dimensional human platelet lysate matrix Stem Cell Res. Ther. 10: 248
  11. Chan, C. et al. (2021) Co-localisation of intra-nuclear membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase and hypoxia inducible factor-2α in osteosarcoma and prostate carcinoma cells Oncol Lett. 21(2): 158
  12. Hernández, J. J. et al. (2021) Dodging COVID-19 infection: low expression and localization of ACE2 and TMPRSS2 in multiple donor-derived lines of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells J. Transl. Med. 19: 149
  13. Widholz, B. et al. (2019) Pooling of Patient-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Reduces Inter-Individual Confounder-Associated Variation without Negative Impact on Cell Viability, Proliferation and Osteogenic Differentiation Cells 8(6): 633
  14. Eremichev, R. et al. (2021) Scar-Free Healing of Endometrium: Tissue-Specific Program of Stromal Cells and Its Induction by Soluble Factors Produced After Damage Front Cell Dev Biol. (9)
  15. Le Naour, A. et al. (2020) Tumor cells educate mesenchymal stromal cells to release chemoprotective and immunomodulatory factors J. Mol. Cell Biol. 12(3): 202
  16. Jungbluth, P. et al. (2019) Human iPSC-derived iMSCs improve bone regeneration in mini-pigs Bone Res. 7: 32
  17. Gutermuth, A. et al. (2019) Descemet's Membrane Biomimetic Microtopography Differentiates Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Into Corneal Endothelial-Like Cells Cornea 38(1): 110

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